The Beautiful Island of Bermuda

Bermuda is the topic of this third and final post about the Mother-Daughter vacation I returned from recently.

We were docked in the Royal Naval Dockyard from Wednesday morning through Friday evening.  There was not a lot to do in the immediate area besides the Calypso Pirate Ship Bar, a couple of souvenir shops, Clock Tower Mall, and the Bermuda Maritime Museum.  

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Royal Naval Dockyard Bermuda

Day 1:  Horseshoe Bay Beach

Out of all the beaches I have visited, Horseshoe Bay is my new favorite.  The water is crystal clear, the sand has a pink tint, there is a multitude of tropical fish, and the overall beauty is breathtaking.

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The beach got it’s name from the shape.  To the right is a big cliff that was calling my name.  The views were worth the pedicure ruining climb to the top.

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Looking down, I could see a little cove that was perfect for people who prefer the calmer side of the beach.

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Below the cliff were little cave areas which were perfect hiding spots for crabs. Some people set up chairs to stay protected from the sun in the little caves.  Mom and I rented chairs, but we were unable to rent umbrellas because the wind was too strong.  

I saw a lot of fish off the rocks close to the shoreline. Being a little explorer, I can never sit in one area.  That led me towards the eastern part of the horseshoe.

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It was very peaceful and I was so thankful for the experience.

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#bikinigoals#summerbodiesaremadeinthewinter

Day 2:  Hartley’s Helmet Diving

Greg Hartley is following the tradition of his father who invented a special diving helmet to keep your face dry as you explore underwater.   The concept is similar to an inverted glass of water with the brass to serves as a weight.

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Bermuda has the 2nd largest barrier reef, only second to Australia.

Greg and his assistant took us 2 miles off the western shore to a reef that was about 10 feet deep.  My Mom and I were a part of the 2nd group of divers so we got to see how the process worked.  It’s funny because I always sign up for these adventures and deep down I have some nervousness.  

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Greg Hartley

Next, it was our turn to dive.  Greg has a tube for divers to hold onto.  He leads us around the reef to the areas that are most open and where the fish he has developed a bond with congregate.  

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Photos by Greg Hartley

Day 3:  Hidden Gems Excursion

Hidden Gems is one of the top rated excursions for Bermuda.  I highly recommend taking this 7-8 hour tour on the first day in port to become more familiar with the island.  For my Mom and I, it worked out best that it was on the last day because there was some strenuous activity involved.  They suggest that you wear tennis shoes and shorts, but we both chose fashion over function.

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Hidden Gems provided us with backpacks full of gear for snorkeling, cave exploring, and bottled water to stay hydrated.  We hiked along the trails and inside the caves.

Next, we actually got to swim inside one of the caves.  No underwater swimming was allowed due to safety concerns. There have been several advanced divers from all over the world who have been killed by swimming through the passage ways in the caves.

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Of course, I was the first person out the group to jump into the water.  The fittest person is always put out on a limb to demonstrate.  The advantage to going first was having the most time to swim. This was a moment I had to pause and say “I’m swimming inside a freaking cave!”  

We left the cave and went over to a cliff for some jumping.  We had our choice between a 10ft or 15ft leap.  I did the 10 ft several times so my Mom could get the perfect photo.  She didn’t risk the jump due to her past hip and back surgeries. 

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After the swimming was a drive to the St . David’s lighthouse where we were served lunch.

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St . David's Lighthouse views

Then, we went to Cooper’s Island Nature Reserve for snorkeling.

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Once we dried off from swimming, we stopped for ice cream at Bailey’s.  On the way back to the ship, the guide pointed out other points of interest.

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The world's smallest drawbridge

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Bermuda Cedar door at St. Luke A.M.E. Church. We smelled some cedar during the hike. To have a closet made of this wood would be awesome.

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Bermuda's drinking water is collected off the roofs of homes.

The Bermudian people were very friendly and hospitable.  The island is only a 2 hour flight from N.Y. and 3 from the Carolinas.  I would love to go back and visit.

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Moongates are all over the island is a passageway of good luck

♡KelsieLou♡

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About KelsieLou

Therapeutic Foster Parent, Teacher, and Runner who believes that life is what you make it. Envision, Empower, and Educate.
This entry was posted in family, Travel and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to The Beautiful Island of Bermuda

  1. GinaB says:

    Hey Kelsie Lou! I’m a fellow blogger and I found your pics on google under Hidden Gem. We were in Bermuda at the same time in August. I wanted to take the tour but forgot about it. Luckily I’ll be back next year which will give me a chance to get some swim lessons in. Was the water in Blue Hole and the cave really deep?

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    • KelsieLou says:

      Hey GinaB! I’m guessing that the water in the cave was about 12 feet deep. We were not allowed to swim underwater for safety reasons. The water can become very cloudy if the salt at the bottom is agitated. My guess for the blue hole is about 16-18 ft. You will definitely need some strong swimming and treading skills for these two activities. There may have been one person who didn’t cave swim and a few people who did not cave jump.

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  2. Pingback: The Beautiful Island of Bermuda | Winds to Americas Cup 2017 Bermuda

  3. First of all…it looks gorgeous!!

    Second of all ABS!! HELLO!! I need your core moves or something because your core looks amazing!!

    It sounds like fun doing a mother/daughter trip. I should see if my mom wants to do one sometime. Glad you had a good time.

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